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Science Happy Hour: Human Health from Medieval to Modern Times

Science Happy Hour: Human Health from Medieval to Modern Times
Mon, Apr 28

06:00 pm

Did
you know that new research shows that your DNA sequence isn't the only way you
inherit traits from your parents - but that scientists had similar ideas even
before we knew about DNA? We're all familiar with how bacteria make us sick,
but did you know that scientists since the 1800s have been experimenting with
using bacteria to treat cancer? Or that the "primitive" medical
practices of using leeches and maggots have stood the test of time? Come find
out the gory details, enjoy themed cocktails, and have your say in a lively
discussion of how old ideas continue to inspire innovation in modern medicine. Enjoy fittingly themed cocktails and have your say in this lively discussion!



*Food and Science Themed Cocktails available for purchase
  • Tickets

    No reservation required

    Price: FREE

  • Location

    Continental Old City

    138 Market Street

    Philadelphia, PA, 19106

    Directions


  • Speakers

    Dr. Nicola Mason
    Dr. Nicola Mason
    Dr. Nicola Mason, a board-certified internal medicine veterinarian, received her degree from the Royal Veterinary College in London and her PhD in Immunology from the Immunology Graduate Group at the University of Pennsylvania. Through her research at Penn Vet, Dr. Mason has developed novel approaches in cancer immunotherapies. Her findings may change the paradigm of canine cancer treatment and provide essential data to advance this approach in humans, including children with osteosarcoma and women with breast cancer.
    Jason Diaz
    Jason Diaz
    Jason received his Bachelor's of Science in Biochemistry from Ithaca College. He is a Ph.D. candidate in Penn's Cell and Molecular Biology program, and studies Merkel Cell Polyomavirus, a recently discovered pathogen associated with a rare skin cancer. In his free time he enjoys playing the viola with the Penn Symphony, sampling the many great restaurants in Philly, and playing way too many board games with his friends.
    Jayatri Das
    Jayatri Das
    Jayatri Das is Chief Bioscientist at The Franklin Institute and a Fellow of the Center for Neuroscience & Society at the University of Pennsylvania. She holds undergraduate degrees in biology and biochemistry from Penn State and earned her Ph.D. in evolutionary biology from Princeton University. She is currently leading development of Your Brain, an exhibit about neuroscience and psychology of the human brain scheduled to open in 2014, as well as The Franklin Institutes programming initiatives to advance informal science education about materials science and nanotechnology around the nation. When shes not engaged in science outreach, she enjoys her ongoing at-home experiment with early childhood development, also known as her three-year-old twins.
    Samantha Falk
    Samantha Falk
    Samantha attended the University of Rochester for her undergraduate studies and is currently a Ph.D. student in Cell and Molecular Biology at the University of Pennsylvania investigating the epigenetic inheritance of the centromere. In her spare time, she enjoys baking, being outdoors, blogging about eating at every restaurant on South Street (http://2girls1street.blogspot.com/) and hanging out with her cat Lobster.
    Stephen J. Kovach, III, MD
    Stephen J. Kovach, III, MD
    Stephen J. Kovach, III, MD is an Assistant Professor of Surgery in the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Perelman School of Medicine and University of Pennsylvania Health System. His practice includes both reconstructive and cosmetic surgery with a special interest in reconstructive microsurgery of oncologic and traumatic defects. Dr. Kovach is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the medical school at George Washington University. He completed his plastic surgery training at Duke University Medical Center.
  • Partners

    The Franklin Institute
    The Franklin Institute
    The Franklin Institute
    In 1824, The Franklin Institute was founded to honor Benjamin Franklin and to advance the usefulness of his inventions. Today, The Franklin Institute is a vibrant organization that continues to offer new and exciting science learning experiences for the citizens of Philadelphia. The Institute has grown to become an integral part of the city by providing a hands-on approach to science and technology through community outreach initiatives and innovative partnerships in public education. It has become a dynamic agent of change through its rich array of exhibitions, programs, lectures, and discussions designed to illuminate issues in contemporary science. The Franklin Institute continues to reflect Benjamin Franklin’s spirit of inquiry and discovery as it strives to inspire an understanding of and passion for science and technology learning.
    Penn Medicine
    Penn Medicine
    Penn Medicine
    Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $4 billion enterprise. Penn's Perelman School of Medicine is currently ranked #2 in U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools and among the top 10 schools for primary care. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $507.6 million awarded in the 2010 fiscal year. The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania -- recognized as one of the nation's top 10 hospitals by U.S. News & World Report; Penn Presbyterian Medical Center; and Pennsylvania Hospital – the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Penn Medicine also includes additional patient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region. Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2010, Penn Medicine provided $788 million to benefit our community.
    University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine
    University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine
    University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine
    In 1884, the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine was established at the urging of the University's School of Medicine. It was recognized that prevention and control of animal diseases had important implications for human health. Human and veterinary medicine were viewed as "one medicine."
    Continental
    Continental
    Continental