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Gaffes on Tap: Science Gone Wrong

Gaffes on Tap: Science Gone Wrong
Mon, Apr 25

06:00 pm - 08:00 pm

Science is no exception to Murphy’s Law. What can go wrong, often does, and in ways that can lead to both unexpected triumph and unmitigated disaster. Join us for an evening of science gaffes where our brave speakers share stories of science fails from today and history. Rate the biggest bloopers on the fail-o-meter, try your hand at some twitter-sized mad libs, and of course, join us in toasting to our completely human ability to make mistakes even in the world of science.
Must be 21+.


Table space is limited. Make sure you arrive early to ensure a seat.
  • Tickets

    No reservation required

    Price: FREE

  • Location

    National Mechanics

    22 South 3rd Street

    Philadelphia, PA, 19106

    Directions


  • Speakers

    Alexis Jeffcoat
    Alexis Jeffcoat
    Alexis Jeffcoat is a Dungeons & Dragons playing history nerd who enjoys being blinded by science in her position managing public programming for the Chemical Heritage Foundation. An active part of the geek community, Alexis can be found collaborating on projects like Science on Tap and is known for her Laurel Hill Cemetery tours and history talks at various geek cafes throughout the city. She received her undergraduate degree in Psychology and European History from Temple University and her Masters in Arts & Humanities from Arcadia University. Alexis’s area of interest/research is Victorian social culture and burial practices. In 2014, she served on the board of Young Involved Philadelphia and was nominated for Geek of the Year by the Philadelphia Geek Awards in 2015.
    Anna Dhody
    Anna Dhody
    As curator of the Mütter Museum of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Anna Dhody, an experienced physical and forensic anthropologist, oversees the Mütter Museum’s “disturbingly informative” collection, and works to provide a unique, informative experience for its 150,000-plus annual visitors. During her tenure at the Mütter museum, Ms. Dhody has curated many exhibits; including The Evolution of Birth, Reading the Dead: How Forensic Anthropologists Study Skeletons to Solve Mysteries and The Mütter Ossuary. She also co-curated Grimms’ Anatomy: Magic and Medicine 1812-2012. She has collaborated with scholars from around the world to conduct research on the Mütter’s collection. One of her main goals is to show that a 19th century collection can have 21st century relevance, academically, medically and artistically.
    Jason Downs
    Jason Downs
    Dr. Jason Downs is Assistant Professor of Biology at Delaware Valley University. He has a BA from the University of Pennsylvania and a PhD from Yale University. His research focuses on systematics (taxonomy), paleobiology, and histology. He is also a Research Associate at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University.
    Jason Poole
    Jason Poole
    Jason Poole is a dinosaur expert and has participated in expeditions in Wyoming, Montana, Egypt, and Patagonia in Argentina. He was part of the team that discovered and prepared the Dreadnoughtus specimen. Jason is interested in talking about fossil faux pas that have led to significant breakthroughs in the field of paleontology. He will address major mistakes in our understanding of the Mesozoic time period, challenge commonly held beliefs, and explain why we don't always know what we think we know when in comes to paleontology.
    Mary Grace Wahl
    Mary Grace Wahl
    Mary Grace Wahl has been at the American Philosophical Society Museum for the past eight years. While there, she has managed a Pew funded grant, which focused on integrating the Museum's collections onto a digital platform, and she currently oversees the management of the collections and exhibitions. Ms. Wahl has worked in the museum field for over 20 years at a variety of institutions, including the American Federation for the Arts and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
  • Partners

    Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University
    Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University
    Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University
    Founded in 1812, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University is a leading natural history museum dedicated to advancing research, education, and public engagement in biodiversity and environmental science. The Academy is the place for young and old to experience natural science in a fun and engaging way. Visitors can stroll through a tropical butterfly garden, touch live animals, meet real scientists, get face-to-face with a towering T. rex, and more.
    Wagner Free Institute of Science
    Wagner Free Institute of Science
    Wagner Free Institute of Science
    In 1855, Philadelphian William Wagner established the Wagner Free Institute of Science as one of the earliest free adult science education programs in the nation. As an educational institution and natural history museum, the Wagner maintains library and museum collections assembled to teach science to the public. These collections now contain over 100,000 specimens, including mounted animals, fossils, rocks, minerals, insects, and shells. The Wagner also offers a range of educational programs, including college-level courses, scientific lecture series and symposia, and science lessons specifically designed for elementary students. With its extensive collections and educational programs, the Wagner Free Institute of Science has carried its legacy into the 21st century, continuing to make science education accessible and interesting for people of all ages.
    Chemical Heritage Foundation
    Chemical Heritage Foundation
    Chemical Heritage Foundation
    The Chemical Heritage Foundation (CHF) initially was launched in 1982 as the Center for the History of Chemistry. Since its beginnings, CHF has striven to foster an understanding of chemistry’s impact on society. As an independent and educational nonprofit organization, CHF maintains major collections of instruments, fine art, photographs, papers, and books which preserve the rich and extensive history of chemistry. CHF continues to inspire a passion for chemistry within the city of Philadelphia through its public programs, museum exhibitions, conferences, and scholarly research center.
    American Philosophical Society
    American Philosophical Society
    American Philosophical Society
    In 1743, Benjamin Franklin founded the American Philosophical Society (APS) for the purpose of “promoting useful knowledge.” As the nation’s first learned society, the APS has played an important role in American cultural and intellectual life. For more than 250 years, the APS has gathered and preserved a rich collection that traces American history and science from the Founding Fathers to the computer age. This collection includes scientific specimens and instruments, portraits, maps, art works, rare books, and more than ten million manuscripts. To this day, the APS continues its mission through excellence in scholarly research, professional meetings, publications, library resources, and museum exhibitions and outreach.
    The College of Physicians of Philadelphia
    The College of Physicians of Philadelphia
    The College of Physicians of Philadelphia
    The College of Physicians of Philadelphia was founded in 1787 by a group of physicians inspired by a mission to create better physicians to better serve the public. A non-profit, educational, and cultural institution, the College of Physicians strives to promote health while upholding the ideals and heritage of medicine. It is a prominent and historical Philadelphia institution, and it is also the nation’s oldest medical society. The College of Physicians continues to honor the mission of its founders by improving the health of the public through service, education, and health advocacy.
    National Mechanics
    National Mechanics
    National Mechanics
    Built by famed architect William Strickland in 1837 the National Mechanics Building has seen banks, churches, clubs, bars and fires pass between its walls, and it’s still standing. This beautiful building, as much a part of Philadelphia history as any tourist attraction, now houses Philadelphia’s favorite bar and restaurant.